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Rosé

Rosé wines have been gaining increased popularity and respect in recent years. There are all types of red grape varietals used to produce rosé, and the colour of the wine is largely determined by the grapes used to make it. Rosé wines can be produced in one of three ways. One method is where the crushed red-skinned grapes remain in contact with the juice for a short period of time – this can be anywhere from a couple of hours to a few days. The grape skins are then discarded during pressing, and unlike red wine production, do not go through the fermentation process. The longer the skins are left in contact with the juice, the more intense the colour of the final wine. Typically, the colour of the wine can range from light pink or shades of pinkish-orange, to darker pinks and salmons. The second method is known as ‘bleeding the vats’ and simply put, this is where rosé wine is produced as a by-product of red wine. Some of the juice is removed from red wine vats at an early stage while it is still pink, which is then fermented separately to produce rosé. The final method is blending, where red wine is simply mixed with white wine. However, this method does not produce very favourable results and is discouraged in most wine growing regions. Many people consider dry rosé wine to be preferable to sweet, and Spain and France in particular are thought to produce some of the best rosés in the world.